Merry Christmas from Bees in Art 2010

Bees in Art Xmas

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Fairy Fights Bumblebee: Arthur Rackham @ Bees in Art

Bee Fights Fairy

Fairy Fights Bumblebee by Arthur Rackham


Following an early false start as a clerk, Rackham went on to be one of the best known and loved book illustrators of late Victorian and early 20th Century Britain. Rackham's Victorian sensibility and consummate draughtsmanship produced illustrations of near hallucinatory scenes, which were full of danger yet never dangerous and imbued with childlike wonder.

In 1907 Rackham illustrated the dreamlike Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Caroll, and fittingly went on in 1908 to illustrate Shakespeare's: A Midsummer-Night's Dream. Widely regarded as one of Rackham's masterpieces, A Midsummer-Night's Dream features 40 coloured plates, including our fairy and bumblebee battle. Populated by Shakespeare's protagonists and other fairies and weird peoples, A Midsummer-Night's Dream proved to be an ideal vehicle for Rackham's art and is now a much sought after book.

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Bee Books @ Bees in Art


Bees in Art Books

Some of the bee books in the Bees in Art bookshop.

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RCA Secret 2010 Revealed

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Bombus subterraneous mezzotint engraving by Andrew Tyzack donated to RCA Secret 2010 and now revealed. Two other mezzotints were donated by Andrew and can be seen at the following links: RCA Secret Drone and RCA Secret Worker.

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Andrew Tyzack @ RCA Secret 2010

Andrew Tyzack has donated three original artworks to RCA Secret 2010. The Royal College of Art hosts RCA Secret annually to raise money to assist young artists studying at the RCA. The name of the artist who created each postcard is kept secret. Last year 2700 postcards went on show, and were sold in aid of the RCA’s Fine Art Student Award Fund. Over 1,000 artists donated their work to RCA Secret 2009, including Tracey Emin, Gerhard Richter, Bill Viola, Julian Opie and Grayson Perry, well as fashion designers Sir Paul Smith, Manolo Blahnik and Erdem.

Exhibition open at the
Royal College of Art, Kensington Gore, London SW7 2EU on Friday 12th November, and then from Sunday 14th November to Friday 19th November, 11am to 6pm (Thursday until 9pm). Please note we are CLOSED on Saturday 13th November. This is due to Government security restrictions for The Festival of Remembrance. Free Admission. The postcards will also be available for viewing on this website from Friday 12 November. The Sale will be on Saturday 20 November, 8am-6pm. Postcards will only be available to purchase in person at the Sale. It is recommended that you prepare a list of cards in advance, as the exhibition will not be open for viewing on the morning of the Sale.

The cards will be sold to the public in a huge one-day sale, with each postcard costing just £45. A maximum of four cards may be purchased per person. You must be registered as a Collector to purchase.
Click here to register.

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Machair Mecca: William Neill paints Bumblebees on the BBC

Machair Mecca: William Neill paints Bumblebees on the BBC

Please click the above link to view this film of William Neill painting bumblebees on the BBC


Artist William Neill loves painting bees, and as such he must scrutinise his subject. These close encounters have made him more fascinated than ever by these incredible insects. The wildflower meadows, or machair, of the Outer Hebrides where Neil paints are a rare haven for bees and a reminder of what much of Britain looked like before intensive farming drained the landscape of its wildflower colour.

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Bees in Art welcomes new artist William Neill

William Neill is an Outer Hebridean wildlife artist and paints the Scottish Isles’ bumblebees, including the rare Bombus distinguendus (The Great Yellow Bumblebee) and Bombus muscorum form agricolae (The Moss Carder Bee). Both of which inhabit the scarce grassland habitat widespread in the Hebrides: the machair.

Great Yellow Bumblebee

Great Yellow Bumblebee by William Neill


William has been fascinated by natural history since the age of eight, when his family moved from town to country, and has been painting even longer. He taught art in Britain and Australia before moving to South Uist, Outer Hebrides, Scotland in 1980.

The landscape and wildlife of the Hebrides, Scotland are a constant inspiration, and William as often as possible works from life in the field, using watercolour and acrylic.

William runs courses on watercolour painting and wildlife art, and occasionally teaches on the further education and degree courses at Taigh Chearsabhagh, the award winning arts centre in North Uist.

William's work has appeared in numerous natural history publications. Notably he has illustrated the Scottish Wildlife Trust's Discovery book of the Western Isles. He exhibited in 2009 at the Scottish Ornithologist’s Centre, Aberlady and as a member of the Society of Wildlife Artists regularly exhibits at their Autumn Exhibition at the Mall Galleries, London.

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William Neill painting bumblebees in his Outer Hebridean garden

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The Empty Skep by Shellie Byatt

The Shape of Magic

4th September - 9th October 2010

Shellie Byatt & Betty Pennell

with ceramics by Jacqueline Leighton Boyce

The Art Shop, Cross Street, Abergavenny NP7 5EH

The Empty Skep

The Empty Skep by Shellie Byatt


There is a common thread that links these artists’ work. Their work is narrative in content, conjuring up magical environments against which human dramas and elusive emotions are played out.” The Art Shop

I was talking with Ronald Pennell about the sad state of the bee world at the moment (and his work in response to it) that I decided to make an image myself. Alas for the poor human in my picture - the skep is empty and she has already been reduced to pretending to be a bee herself (wings and striped dress) perhaps trying to use a sort of sympathetic magic! The image is made of paper and pencil on board in a type of collage that I have developed over the years - no imported images, all of the image is made first-hand by me.” Shellie Byatt

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Bees In Art: Raising Awareness About Pollinators In Peril

Beekeeping in Britain
Beekeeping in Britain by Andrew Tyzack


Bees In Art: Raising Awareness About Pollinators In Peril
Andrew Tyzack and Debbie Grice Found Special Gallery To Celebrate Role Of Bees In Our Lives
Written By
Todd Wilkinson

As artists who together operate The Land Gallery in England in East Yorkshire, they decided to do something about it: Put out a call to other artists and open a virtual gallery with procceds from the sale of artwork going to the cause of pollinator conservation. Tyzack has a particular insight into the problem, which in many parts of the globe has manifested itself as Colony Collapse Disorder. Outbreaks of CCD have been blamed on a virulent combination of mites and a fungus killing honey bees with weakened immune systems potentially caused by exposure to pesticides. Loss of habitat also is taking a serious toll on wild bees, with several species in the U.S. now imperiled.

Tyzack himself is a third-generation beekeeper, a practitioner of the apiary arts, husbanding his domestic honey hives to make sweet honey.

More and more, artists are stepping forward to aid in the cause of conservation. This effort on behalf of pollinators is similar to one led by biologist Kerry Kriger who founded Save The Frogs and has sponsored an art contest that is open to painters of all ages.

Bees in Art celebrates Hymenoptera, the order of insect that encompasses honey bees, bumblebees and related species. He said that he and Grice welcome artists in North America to contact him if they are interested in supporting bee conservation by making works available for sale...

For complete article please visit
The Wildlife Art Journal.

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New Queen Honeybee Engraving by Andrew Tyzack

Queen honeybee mezzotint engraving by Andrew Tyzack. Now available framed and matted. A limited edition of 60 printed on Hahnemühle acid free paper.


Honeybee queen

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New in Bees in Art: Honeybee tryptich by Richard Lewington

New in Bees in Art: Honeybee tryptich: Drone: Queen: Worker. An open edition print by renowned insect artist Richard Lewington. Signed in pencil.

Honeybee tryptich

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Beekeeping Glass by Ronald Pennell

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CAA: Wendy Ramshaw and The Honey Bee and the Hive

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Gorst & Bombus by Anna Kirk Smith has been sold

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Rick Lieder @ Bees in Art

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BBC Gardens Illustrated

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Bees in Art Twitter news feed

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Bees in Art Facebook fan page

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A Church Apiary on the North York Moors

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Six Bumblebee Queens: Mezzotint Engraving

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A Queen Honeybee: From boxwood round to finished wood engraving.

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Honeybee queen drawing and wood engraving

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Mark Rowney @ Bees in Art

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Maeterlinck and E. J. Detmold: The Life of the Bee

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Happy New Year from Bees in Art 2010

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