Sarah Hatton's Bee Works - Thousands of dead honeybees arranged into dizzying mathmatical patterns


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sm-hatton_Circle 2_2013_36 x 36_mixed media on panel

Circle 2. Honey bees (Apis mellifera), resin on panel, 2013. (36" diameter)

Sarah Hatton's Bee Works - Thousands of dead honeybees arranged into dizzying mathmatical patterns

Sarah Hatton links neonicotinoid pesticides and the worldwide decline of bee populations, arranging dead bees in mathematical patterns symbolically linked to monoculture crops, such as the Fibonacci spiral found in the seed pattern of the sunflower.

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Florid. Honey bees (Apis mellifera), resin on panel, 2013. (48" x 48")

sarah_hatton In "Florid", 500 dead bees are placed in the same seed arrangement found on the seed head of a sunflower. The pattern follows the Fibonacci curve - a sequence found in many spiral arrangements in nature, and one that produces a repetitive, destabilizing effect when you stand in front of it. The vertigo that the viewer feels in the swarm pattern of the sunflower echoes the bees' loss of ability to navigate due to the toxins held within the very thing that provides their sustenance. Circle 1. Honey bees (Apis mellifera), resin on panel, 2013. (36" diameter)Circle 2. Honey bees (Apis mellifera), resin on panel, 2013. (36" diameter) Thousands of bees are arranged in mandala patterns from famous crop circles. Here, the implication is that of the unknown cause and the unknown threat (although we know the cause to be man-made), and crop-based human interference that is, again, causing this mass disorientation.

To learn more about her work, follow Sarah:

Web:
www.sarahhattonartist.com
Facebook:
www.facebook.com/sarahhattonartist
Twitter: sarah_hatton

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Circle 1. Honey bees (Apis mellifera), resin on panel, 2013. (36" diameter)